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Showing content with the highest reputation since 03/18/2019 in all areas

  1. 2 points
    Have to share. This was cute. The special note was from Caleb (7yo). 🀣
  2. 2 points
    Feeling cute. Might make a hydei culture later, idk. πŸ€£πŸ‘
  3. 2 points
    I invited Yen Saw to join my FaceBook group and OMG he joined. He is like the Mantis Breeder Hero LOL LOL I'm such a fan!! I've ordered from him a few times and he very much deserves every good thing said about him.
  4. 2 points
    BB flies are starting to pop. Took 10 days. 70F until I started warming them up a bit Saturday evening. πŸ˜ŽπŸ‘ Maybe I ought to carefully warm them right through. Afraid of dessication though.
  5. 2 points
  6. 2 points
    I just got back from a 5-day camping trip in Shenandoah. The area is beautiful! Pics tomorrow. I got home to 13 new spiny nymphs and two new Sybilla pretiosa nymphs. I'm bummed that the Sybilla ooth didn't hatch more. The female orchid and two female ghost will be molting to adult any day now. I'm getting my crested gecko soon too! - MantisGirl13
  7. 2 points
    Hosting Caleb's 7th BDay party today. All our mantises dressed to the 9s. πŸ‘ŠπŸ€£
  8. 2 points
    Bellatrix went to the big terrarium in the sky today 😭 She was my favorite Ghost, my lil green bug eating machine. I woke to find her barely hanging from the tulle in her enclosure. I tried to give her some water or honey, but she was pretty far gone and was just striking at things out of instinct. I held her and thanked her for being my friend, then put her in the freezer. R.I.P Bellatrix: you were a special lady and a great mantis She laid 7 oothecca and lived 4 months as an adult ❀️
  9. 2 points
    Well, I thought my orchid gal was subadult because she was L7 and Graceface said that female orchids are adult at L8, but it turns out she molted again (to sub this time) and she is HUGE! Pictures to come.I - MantisGirl13
  10. 2 points
    Just came from work and Mocha is in the middle of molting!! The first ghost molting I've witnessed! She's beautiful!
  11. 2 points
    Introduction Hymenopus coronatus, Orchid Mantis The nymphs are spectacular mimics of orchid flowers and look very much like a tiny version of the popular moth orchid flowers seen at various stores. Southeast Asia, most common stock from Malaysia. Difficulty level: intermediate Development Molts take place about every three weeks until the ultimate molt which can take twice as long. Hatchlings are red and black and may mimic certain assassin bugs. Later instars to adult are white to pink. Adults live from three to six months, rarely much longer. Molting rarely encounters problems in captivity despite the leg extensions. Behavior/temperament Nymphs usually stay in one spot to catch prey but will chase after crickets if hungry enough. Neither timid nor aggressive. Propensity to cannibalize is limited; not communal. Dynamics of threat display - none. Captive Environment Temperature range and humidity levels - room temperature to tropical (72-90F). High humidity without adequate ventilation will kill specimens. Type and size of enclosure(s) used - absolute minimum 32oz. for the large females. Substrate or lack thereof- none required. Cage furnishings, e.g. molting surfaces, perches, dΓ©cor, plants, etc. -may shield prey, not needed. Communal housing if applicable - not a good idea. Feeding Feeding response - moths and flies are most attractive. Type and size of prey used and/or refused for various instars - fruit flies for the early instars, then crickets, cockroaches and flies. Quantity and frequency of feedings - late instar female nymphs can consume large quantities of prey daily. Breeding Sexing/sexual dimorphism - females look similar to the males but are a dozen times more massive. Time needed from last molt to copulation - 3-4 wks. Multiple males are suggested for mating. While rearing up nymphs is basic for anyone with limited experience, getting fertile eggs is expert level. Tips for inducing copulation and fecundity - Multiple males in a flight cage and warm temperatures. Fertile or not there are generally three oothecae per female. Tips for inducing female to lay oothecae - green/living plant leaves. Oothecae Physical description and average size. - thin and elongate, up to four inches long and a quarter inch wide. Diapause if necessary - none. Incubation time and temperature - approximately 40 days at 80F. Observed number/s and range of hatching nymphs - highly variable, avg. ~40
  12. 1 point
    I just spent the last hour feeding fruit flies to almost fifty, soon to be more, nymphs of several different species. On top of that, I'm sick. Fun day! (Not) I'm pooped. - MantisGirl13
  13. 1 point
    **** News Flash **** Orchid mantis jumps off keepers hand, flies across room and lands on table leg **** End of message ****
  14. 1 point
    Welcome to Granny's Mantis Photo Collection Photos may not be used, shared or reprinted without permission. My name and (C) may not be removed! All photo's taken by me of my own mantis. I love to take photos so this is really just the beginning. Check back I always have new stuff to add
  15. 1 point
    Loving MantidForum, looking forward to learning much much much more and meeting everyone!
  16. 1 point
    Hooray, Ghost hadnt eaten for 2 and a half weeks and I was getting a little worried but saw this morning the exuvium there, successful moult ! Lucy the idol is eating well and seems to have discovered her ability to jump. Good Times !
  17. 1 point
    Nice to see pupae from a 'new cup' eclosing. To me, this means my process is becoming more reliable. If so, I should see it pop strong this weekend sometime.
  18. 1 point
    If everything goes well, ill have two sexed pairs of i4/i5 orchids next week.
  19. 1 point
    Flies..... Flies everywhere.... πŸ˜ŽπŸ‘
  20. 1 point
    NoΓ«l is calling again. Soon my orchids will be calling too. I sure could use a pair of orchid subadult males. πŸ€”
  21. 1 point
    It's been a little while and I promise I'm still around, just a lot of life things happening at the moment. The ghosts are all doing really well! ButterRum-Verde molted the first week or March into a beautiful green mantis! Her wings are a little lighter than Iris'! Mocha is actually on the verge of a molt! I'm pretty excited for her! She is still a beautiful brown and I believe she will keep this rich deep brown which is a OKAY! Lol I'm hoping for a molt today or tomorrow!
  22. 1 point
    Can't wait till tomorrow! I am going to the Philly Insectarium with a friend of mine. They have mantids!! - MantisGirl13
  23. 1 point
    Introduction Galanthias amoena, African flower mantis This small species nearly reaches 3cm long. It has a very long, skinny thorax. It is dull green with a whitish abdomen. Halfway down the back of the abdomen is a black stripe, not unlike Pseudoharpax virescens. The wings are a light green. Males are skinnier than females. Found in central Africa Difficulty level: beginner Development Nymphs take a while (up to 3 weeks) to molt to L2, however subsequent instars seem shorter (8-10 days). Feeding frequency is more of a factor than temperature. Adulthood can be reached 8-9 weeks after hatching. Males live about 5 weeks after becoming adult, while females live for about 3 months. Both sexes are subadult at L6. Behavior/temperament These insects are active. They run and jump a lot, and young nymphs readily escape. These insects are somewhat shy, particularly in early instars. They seem fairly communal and don't attack particularly large prey (though mated females become more brazen with food size). As long as food is plentiful, aggression is low. I seem to notice later instar nymphs go missing in group housing on occassion, so if you have only a few, it may benefit you to separate them at L5. Generally, though, enough nymphs in a group cage make it to maturity to allow for breeding. Captive Environment Room temperature (64-78F) suffices for these insects. They appreciate twice weekly misting when young, though high humidity isn't needed. They seem fine with paper towel on the bottom of the container, and I usually offer fake plants for climbing. They don't mind heavily planted containers. Since they are small, food storage sized containers with ventilated lids suffice. I usually house adults in 32oz deli cups and groups of young nymphs in 32oz cube containers used for human food. Net cages or tall 5 gallon containers work well for groups of L4 or older nymphs. I use pop-up round butterfly cages for groups of older nymphs. I trim live ragweed and goldenrod, shake off the spiders, and place it within the cages. Nymphs appreciate the perches, and it is not necessary to replenish foliage when it dries out. If you wish to house these individually, 16oz deli cups are large enough for the final molt. Feeding Feeding response: These insects enthusiastically chase prey items. Even tiny adult males eat a few times per week, although I suspect that much like Creobroter, overfed males may have trouble connecting during mating. Type and size of prey used and/or refused for various instars: L1 and L2 can handle D. hydei. I usually feed them hydei through L3 before switching to houseflies or various small syrphid flies and halictid/andrenid bees, depending on the season. I live near a blueberry patch surrounded by netting that traps a banquet of insects between June and October. Syrphid flies are particularly attracted to hydrangea and yarrow flowers. L4 seem a bit small for bottleflies, though subadults eat them without issue. Small bees also work for L4/5 nymphs. Quantity and frequency of feedings: I usually just keep food plentiful. 4 or 5 insects per nymph is good, and when prey disappears I add more. These insects eat quite a bit for their size. Mated females love wild moths and such and eat nonstop. Breeding Sexing/sexual dimorphism: the bottom of the abdomen of males has a few small, blunt segments. The female has a large pointy segment at the end. Depending on your eyesight, this is appearant at L4 onward. As adults, males are narrower and the abdomen is completely concealed by the wings when viewed from above. Time needed from last molt to copulation: 5 or 6 days for males, 8-10 for females Pairing is easy to achieve, particularly when the female is well fed. Simply have the mature male in a good sized cage and add the female near him. The female isn't particularly aggressive and mating usually takes around 3 hours. I mate mine a few times. Mated females need only a few small pieces of fake foliage and a good flow of food to oviposit. Females lay ooths around 3 weeks of age and will deposit one every 5-12 days, depending on how often she is fed. I usually just fatten up females with a variety of moths, flies, and bees. Oothecae: The ooth of this mantis is fairly about the size of a watermelon seed. It is roughly cubical in shape, with ribs down the sides. It is a dark brown color, although fresh ooths are tan. Incubation at room temp with regular (2-3 times weekly) misting suffices. About 6 weeks later, 10-15 nymphs will hatch. Text and photo submitted by mantisloverguy6000
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