pollen!

Mantidforum

Help Support Mantidforum:

agent A

the autistic flower mantis
Supporting Member
Joined
May 17, 2009
Messages
8,436
Reaction score
757
Location
Fort Collins, CO
hey all,

so last year I read an article that pollen in the diet of hatchling mantises reduces mortality rate, and so I make it a habit to keep sprigs of some flowering plant with flowers in hatchling setups. right now, I am forcing out willow stems for this purpose  and will use willow through its blooming cycle (until May)

anyone else do this? anyone else interested in male willow sprigs for this type of thing?

 

TheWrongCrowd

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 21, 2021
Messages
156
Reaction score
46
Location
Seattle, Wa
I heard about this as well. I usually feed my flies the pollen though, however I'd love to know how it turns out for you. I actually got some male willow sprigs for this a bit ago to try out, but I wanted to learn more about it first. Best of luck! 

 

happy1892

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 13, 2011
Messages
2,558
Reaction score
112
Location
North Carolina
Hello agent A (Alex, mantisloverguy6000)!  Long time since I have been on mantidforum.  How are you? 

 I was thinking about using honeybees as feeders for mantises.  Honeybees have pollen in their guts I believe (I see yellow and orange in the guts of our squished bees).

You can overwinter honeybees indoors, sending out a PVC pipe from the entrance of the hive through a wooden baffle out the window.  Here in North Carolina we have pollen year round, so if you feed sugar syrup to the hive, they will produce more bees.  

I have also thought about putting mantises in screen cages that have screens large enough for honeybees to get through the screen, yet keep the mantis in.  I would put a light bulb in each screen cage to attract the honeybees into the screen cage for the mantises to eat the bees.  So I would have to just release some bees out of a hole in the hive indoors and turn the light bulbs on in the screen cages for feeding time.  Haven't actually tried this idea, though.

-Nathaniel Long

 
Last edited by a moderator:

TheWrongCrowd

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 21, 2021
Messages
156
Reaction score
46
Location
Seattle, Wa
Hello agent A (Alex, mantisloverguy6000)!  Long time since I have been on mantidforum.  How are you? 

 I was thinking about using honeybees as feeders for mantises.  Honeybees have pollen in their guts I believe (I see yellow and orange in the guts of our squished bees).

You can overwinter honeybees indoors, sending out a PVC pipe from the entrance of the hive through a wooden baffle out the window.  Here in North Carolina we have pollen year round, so if you feed sugar syrup to the hive, they will produce more bees.  

I have also thought about putting mantises in screen cages that have screens large enough for honeybees to get through the screen, yet keep the mantis in.  I would put a light bulb in each screen cage to attract the honeybees into the screen cage for the mantises to eat the bees.  So I would have to just release some bees out of a hole in the hive indoors and turn the light bulbs on in the screen cages for feeding time.  Haven't actually tried this idea, though.

-Nathaniel Long
Thats interesting, I'd love to know how that goes

 
Last edited by a moderator:

Mantidfinatic13

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 26, 2020
Messages
189
Reaction score
76
Location
Sydney Australia
Hello agent A (Alex, mantisloverguy6000)!  Long time since I have been on mantidforum.  How are you? 

 I was thinking about using honeybees as feeders for mantises.  Honeybees have pollen in their guts I believe (I see yellow and orange in the guts of our squished bees).

You can overwinter honeybees indoors, sending out a PVC pipe from the entrance of the hive through a wooden baffle out the window.  Here in North Carolina we have pollen year round, so if you feed sugar syrup to the hive, they will produce more bees.  

I have also thought about putting mantises in screen cages that have screens large enough for honeybees to get through the screen, yet keep the mantis in.  I would put a light bulb in each screen cage to attract the honeybees into the screen cage for the mantises to eat the bees.  So I would have to just release some bees out of a hole in the hive indoors and turn the light bulbs on in the screen cages for feeding time.  Haven't actually tried this idea, though.

-Nathaniel Long
Sounds like a great experiment!

 

agent A

the autistic flower mantis
Supporting Member
Joined
May 17, 2009
Messages
8,436
Reaction score
757
Location
Fort Collins, CO
Hello agent A (Alex, mantisloverguy6000)!  Long time since I have been on mantidforum.  How are you? 

 I was thinking about using honeybees as feeders for mantises.  Honeybees have pollen in their guts I believe (I see yellow and orange in the guts of our squished bees).

You can overwinter honeybees indoors, sending out a PVC pipe from the entrance of the hive through a wooden baffle out the window.  Here in North Carolina we have pollen year round, so if you feed sugar syrup to the hive, they will produce more bees.  

I have also thought about putting mantises in screen cages that have screens large enough for honeybees to get through the screen, yet keep the mantis in.  I would put a light bulb in each screen cage to attract the honeybees into the screen cage for the mantises to eat the bees.  So I would have to just release some bees out of a hole in the hive indoors and turn the light bulbs on in the screen cages for feeding time.  Haven't actually tried this idea, though.

-Nathaniel Long
hi Nathaniel,

i have been really busy

that idea sounds like it would need a lot of technical skill in setting up pipes and such. I would just net the bees and toss them into cups. but i wouldn't rely on bees as a sole food source: variety is best

 

happy1892

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 13, 2011
Messages
2,558
Reaction score
112
Location
North Carolina
hi Nathaniel,

i have been really busy

that idea sounds like it would need a lot of technical skill in setting up pipes and such. I would just net the bees and toss them into cups. but i wouldn't rely on bees as a sole food source: variety is best
Hello!  I saw you posting scientific articles on insects I think. (https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Alex-Baranowski Is this you?)   I was excited to see that you were already doing such things! 

Actually, the PVC pipes are easy to set-up.  Lifting the bee hive is the hard part... I get smaller hives that are lighter.  You cut the PVC pipe to the right size with a skill saw or sharp hand saw.  You get a piece of wooden board to fit under the window for a baffle to let the pipe go outside (drill the right size hole, I forgot what kind of drilling piece it is called, but it makes large holes.).  Then you attatch the pipe to a hole in the bee hive (the bee hive's entrance) with a screw and screwdriver (pre-drill a hole through the plastic pipe for the screw to go through).  

Sorry, I know pictures would be worth a thousand words to explain this, but I don't have any handy at the moment to show.

Sincerely, Nathaniel Long

 
Last edited by a moderator:

agent A

the autistic flower mantis
Supporting Member
Joined
May 17, 2009
Messages
8,436
Reaction score
757
Location
Fort Collins, CO
Hello!  I saw you posting scientific articles on insects I think. (https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Alex-Baranowski Is this you?)   I was excited to see that you were already doing such things! 

Actually, the PVC pipes are easy to set-up.  Lifting the bee hive is the hard part... I get smaller hives that are lighter.  You cut the PVC pipe to the right size with a skill saw or sharp hand saw.  You get a piece of wooden board to fit under the window for a baffle to let the pipe go outside (drill the right size hole, I forgot what kind of drilling piece it is called, but it makes large holes.).  Then you attatch the pipe to a hole in the bee hive (the bee hive's entrance) with a screw and screwdriver (pre-drill a hole through the plastic pipe for the screw to go through).  

Sorry, I know pictures would be worth a thousand words to explain this, but I don't have any handy at the moment to show.

Sincerely, Nathaniel Long
yes. I have published 8 articles, 5 first authored papers

 

lectricblueyes

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 13, 2009
Messages
428
Reaction score
10
Location
Chicago, IL 60609
I'm very curious to see what you find.  I have really good mortality rates but adding pollen is an interesting idea.  I know years ago (2008/2009) I believe Peter sold pollen on his site to "dust" the feeders  before giving to the mantid.  Pollen dust is pretty cheap ($10/pound) and a pound could last a very long time.  

 

agent A

the autistic flower mantis
Supporting Member
Joined
May 17, 2009
Messages
8,436
Reaction score
757
Location
Fort Collins, CO
I'm very curious to see what you find.  I have really good mortality rates but adding pollen is an interesting idea.  I know years ago (2008/2009) I believe Peter sold pollen on his site to "dust" the feeders  before giving to the mantid.  Pollen dust is pretty cheap ($10/pound) and a pound could last a very long time.  
yes. i actually was hoping to have hatchlings of something for this exact reason, but I don't currently so now i have rooted gray willow stems with catkins in the lab with nobody to use them

there will be other chances though

 
Last edited by a moderator:

Latest posts

Top